Training methods and ideas thread

Any chat about technique, training methods, requests for advice etc.
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Training methods and ideas thread

Post by bruce » Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:29 pm

Thought now I'd created a technique area, we could break the thread out into some different areas; this one is for training ideas and drills.

A few from the original thread:
Jester wrote:Yesterday, for the first time in 10 weeks, I got out to the park to blow away the cobwebs and boy did I need it. I had packed my bag with plenty of drivers, but in the end I just spent 2 hours throwing Rocs trying to remember what a throw felt like!

There have been questions on the thread recently about approaching, so I thought I'd share what drills I did on this. I began 30 yards away from target (in this case a tree) and threw all 9 Rocs at it aiming to get everything inside a 5 yard radius.

After doing this between two trees 4 times I moved back to 50yards and did the same thing, then finally 70 yards (by this time I wasn't being so strict about the 5yard radius!). To finish off I came back to 30 yards and did one more set which felt a lot easier than it did during the first sets. The targets were on different levels so I was also getting practice as throwing up and downhill.

I still feel out of practice but am glad to be finding this out now when I can do something about it rather than in two week's time at Whitcombe.
bruce wrote:Thought I'd share a couple of practice methods I've used:

1) Take a skillshot or similar out into a wide open field. Starting from around 30m throw four approaches; 1 hyzer, 1 straight, 1 anhyzer, 1 sidearm. Go putt them all out. If there's any significant wind, I'll do this from a few different directions. Then move out to 40m, repeat, 50m repeat, out to around 70m. Aiming obviously to get up and down with every approach.
Pros: you get to practice all your approaching skills, plus you get some varied putting practice
Cons: you need a basket and a wide open space

2) An open field again, and a small collection of cones/sticks/anything that will be visible from distance. Find somewhere throw from, then pace out and mark 10m intervals from 30m to 100m away from you. Throw a hyzer to each of the markers, starting from 30 and working out. It doesn't have to be a pure hyzer, just keep the whole flight to the right-hand side of the line (if you're a righty). After collecting the discs, walk 30m past the 100m marker, and repeat, heading back to your original position. The repeat the whole exercise throwing anhyzers (or at least throws that start out down the left).
Pros: You rapidly learn distance control and how your discs react to certain lines.
Cons: It's only really practical to practice two wind directions in any session
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Post by rhatton1 » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:17 pm

Another idea lifted from Discgolfreview which I can't beleive I didn't think off before.

Fix an old sheet across your garage or any spacious indoor area you and more importantly the missus doesn't mind you throwing discs in and make a target on it.

Hit target with putts, your normal mid range shots and drives. The sheet should take all the force out and give you a good way of getting a load of throws in in the winter months. Obviously you have to intersperse this with time on the practice field to make sure you're not picking up bad habits.

Winter evening training - Done.
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Post by Village » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:20 pm

All I need now is a garage.....
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Post by Jester » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:26 pm

Village wrote:All I need now is a garage.....
And a sheet.
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Post by Village » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:28 pm

Jester wrote:
Village wrote:All I need now is a garage.....
And a sheet.
nope, got sheets!
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Re: Training methods and ideas thread

Post by Jester » Fri Jan 22, 2010 6:31 pm

bruce wrote:Thought now I'd created a technique area, we could break the thread out into some different areas; this one is for training ideas and drills.
Nice idea, Bruce, to split these into two.

Putting
I know it's not the case for everyone, but I rather enjoy practicing putting. I have a drill I can clip to 5-10 minutes to use pre-round as a warm up when there isn't the 30-45 minutes available for a full putting session.

I don't like to start a tournament round without practicing at least the short range putts, the ones that I would be annoyed to miss during the round. Therefore the pre-round drill concentrates on these short putts to build confidence. The full session builds confidence at short range before moving out to longer ranges and then back to short.


Pre-round warm up 5-10 minutes
Take 3 discs you can putt with (e.g. your putter and your 2 straightest approach discs) and pick a basket that's in an open area of space. I look for one with a good clear space around it in all directions (I look for 7y clearance as 7y and less is my 'I'm annoyed I missed that' range, but you should use whatever is right for you e.g. 6 or 5y)
1 Stand by the basket, facing the wind if there is any, and walk away from it 5 big steps (roughly 5y)
2 Take your three putts from the same place. Concentrate on getting all three in, you must treat them like real putts for the practice to be of any use
3 Pick up your 3 discs and stand by the basket again. Turn 90 degrees away from the direction you've just putted from, take 5 big steps and repeat step 2
4 Repeat steps 2 & 3 until you've taken 12 practice putts (3 each from four stations effectively 'north', 'south', 'east' and 'west' of the basket)
5 Now repeat the whole process but come out to 7y each time rather than 5y
6 You've now had 24 practice putts from two lengths in taill, head and two cross winds. To finish off, come back into 5 yards and pick a few random spots to putt from. These should all feel easier than the first round of putts. Confidence built!

Think about how the conditions affected your putting from the different positions and you can use this in the round to pick the right aiming point to have the best chance at getting each putt e.g. if you get a 6 yarder at 45 degrees to the wind rather than 90 you'll know your aiming point is about halfway between the points you've practiced


Full practice session 30-45 minutes
This is an extended version of the above drill

Rather than just doing putts on the 90 degree angles, add in the 45s too to give you 8 equally spaced stations

After doing 5y and 7y move back to bigger distances. I like to do 5, 7, 10, 12 and 15y which is 120 putts in total. After doing the set from 15y I go back to 7y to finish off and it feels like the basket is massive. :)
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Post by TreeCracker » Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:12 pm

Village wrote:All I need now is a garage.....
...and a spacious indoor area wouldn't go amiss either!
Don't hit the tree! Don't hit the tr...Damn.

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Post by rhatton1 » Thu Feb 18, 2010 3:21 pm

I was asked by one of the first timers to Chilly Chuck this weekend for pointers on tournament play a couple of days ago. Now many of you would probably think I would be the worst person to ask but still the advice below are the main things that struck me (and also the main things I wish I would do, I might actually get the scores I should then) Some of the paragraphs were in reponse to questions asked so they might not make total sense!

Does anyone else have any good tips for those entering their first tournaments?

You know you can shoot sub 60 rounds. Don’t expect it though. Whatever you do don’t get hung up by the score. Counting it shot by shot is self defeating. AS much as possible let it go and just play the one shot at a time. You are much more likely to make a putt if you go up to it thinking “ I will make this putt.” Instead of thinking “Hmm, I need this putt for a three but if I miss short it should be a drop in for four, don’t go at it too much otherwise I might go too far past and only get a five” It sounds obvious but the thought will go through your head on the weekend and the best way to get rid of it is to reset and focus again, don’t be afraid to take your time if you need it. You have 30 seconds a shot, that’s a long time and you have time to walk away if you can’t focus first time you set up. Just tell yourself to relax focus on one link of the chains and kerching, the disc goes in.

Just look at each hole you come to and evaluate what you want from it. Not the score though. For example hole one I will step up to it and try and make my thought process on the drive focus purely on “I want the disc to go through the first gap and land somewhere just in the mouth of the second.” I then try to reinforce the feeling I want in the drive, hence the repeated practice pull throughs until I feel the strains in the right places and know if I replicate that feeling it will be a good drive and will go to where I am thinking. I try to never go into it thinking I will get a three/four here. The score is an illusionary beast, thinking about it will almost never make you play better. You can’t really at the start of a hole think how you will finish it, let alone what your socre will be at the end of a round, only what you are doing then, which is the drive. Then focus on the approach, “where do I want it to land, how will the disc fly and what path will it take to achieve this, what do I need my body to do to achieve this?” Then the putt “ I will make this putt, etc. “ and bang you have a three. Your body will follow your brain, your body has the ability to do everything, you just have to make your brain let it.

Tournament play is very different from anything you’ve played before. Completely different to the match play and practice environment. It should hopefully still be really good fun, but don’t be demoralised if you shoot 5 - 10 shots per round worse than you would expect. The slow pace and the expectations you put on yourself will inhibit you if you let them. If you can keep your focus, stay relaxed and enjoy it you will be fine! (SO far I never have, but this weekend I will!)

One thing I’ve just found recently that works brilliantly for me when It all starts to feel like it is going wrong is to just straighten my back and shoulders and walk with purpose and a bit of bounce between shots and holes. Its amazing the difference an enforced positive posture can have on your actual game. It’s a case of tricking your brain into thinking all is well.

Also make sure you get down there in time to have a good warm up, but don’t knacker yourself out before the first round. Whilst you are easily fit enough to play three rounds in a day normally, tournament play does seem to be more tiring somehow. The two rounds will take it out of you more than two normally would! Practice putting from close range and make sure you nail a load of putts just before you start a round, if necessary do this from three meters. It will really help your putting confidence when you start, you’ve tricked your brain into thinking that everytime you step up to putt it goes into the chains. Don’t take loads of putts from 10 meters and get one in ten in. It won’t help you. There is a definite pressure to do this though as there will be a lot of good putters there nailing them from all over and you will probably worry about looking sh%t in front of them. If you are worried about that find a basket away from everyone else and just relax and get used to hitting the chains.

If during a round you don’t know something, or have any doubts ask someone. They are nearly always very willing to help.



Most of all enjoy!
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Post by dunc » Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:42 pm

My tournament tips... and like Rich I never follow them all

!. Relax - All pressure is self inflicted, take your time, deep steady breaths

2. Play your own game - know what you can and can't do, don't try a shot just because it worked for someone else, by all means make a note of the shot and try it in practice next week.... but don't experiment in a tournament 8/10 times it will cost you shots

3. Visualisation - Imagine the shot you are about to play, rehearse it in your head, rehearse it on the tee/behind your marker and then let the shot flow out

4a. Don't try too hard - by trying to hard you will tense up, your throw will be jerky not smooth and you lose distance as well as accuracy

4b. Don't chase the low scores - let the low scores come to you (similar to point 4a) Don't try to make up for a bad hole by thinking you must birdie the next, invariably you will get back to back bogeys

5. Putting - Do this exactly how you do in practice. Pick a specific link in the chains, don't just aim for that big basket. by narrowing your aiming to a specific point it will greatly improve the grouping of your putts.... and use the same putting style for each putt, unless you are forced not to by your lie, bush, tree etc. Focus on making the putt and invariably you will. Positive mental attitude!

6. Enjoy - don't let a bad throw or hole detract from your round/tournament experience, rarely does a bad mood mean good play! don't dwell, move on, crack a joke or listen to Ivan and your round will be fun!
Last edited by dunc on Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Jester » Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:44 pm

There are some great pointers there from Rich and Dunc. I would echo the main piece of advice for any player (new and experience alike) is relax and enjoy yourself! Getting wound up becuase of a bad shot (I think I might have perhaps been guilty of this once or twice in the past ) is completely counter productive to your game and just creates bad feeling in the group.

Next shot
Like the Old Bull himself, Liam 'Forever' Young always said, it's not about what you just did (the drive of your life or a total worm burner), it's about what you're about to do next. As soon as your throw is over, stop thinking about it (like how good or bad it was). You can't change it, all you can do is think about your next shot.

Focus on, focus off
When you are considering and playing your shot give it 100% of your attention, but between shots enjoy the walk, look at the river, spot the swans or whatever you want to rest your mind. If you try and analyse every detail for 18 holes you'll go crazy. Relax in the round and save the analysis for lunchtime.

Tournament etiquet
A few simple things:
- Keep yourself and your stuff out of the way! Don't leave your bag on the tee and keep behind the player throwing, espeically when on the tee
- If you have advanced up the fairway to save some time that's ok, but keep to the side until the other person has taken their shot
- Be aware that there are other golfers playing around you, try and make sure your movement or chatter is not distracting to them

Never. Give. Up.
The toughest thing in the world, when things are going right for everyone else but wrong for you, is to grin and bear it. It happens, don't worry, just keep thinking about the next shot and you'll pull through. You will have rounds you just want to walk away from (my first at Frostbreaker 3 weeks ago springs to mind) but you never know what's happening with the rest of the field. In that particular case there was a big swing on Sunday and I went from 14th to 3rd. Never. Give. Up.

Looking forward to seeing faces new and old this weekend. :wink:
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Post by bruce » Fri Feb 19, 2010 10:15 am

Jester wrote:Never. Give. Up.
^^This^^

But also...
I tend to disagree slightly with Rich about not having a score target, although I take his point as far as it applies to rookies.

I like to have a target score for every hole I play, in a rough kind of way. So at QP hole 1 I'm targeting a 3, I know that when I step up to the tee, and the shot I elect to throw should reflect that. So while I might well be able to throw a driver through the first gap, have it fade and come to rest in the second gap and give myself a long putt for a 2, I'll get a lot more 4s that way. Instead I throw a Roc because it's won't get a wicked fade into the trees, or go too long into the bushes, erring on the right side because I know I can get up and down from the trees in the middle of the fairway a darn sight easier than from the left.

So yes, play one shot at a time, but play it not just on its merits but on the merits of the next shot you'll have to play too. Just cos you can do some thing doesn't mean you should
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Post by Village » Fri Feb 19, 2010 10:40 am

I found inspiration in the pages of Inflight Magazine, in a player profile for Paul "Frank Bongo" Knutton, he gave a piece of advice that I try to apply in all aspects of my life:

"It's all about desire. You've got to want it!"

nuff said.........
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Post by Del » Fri Feb 19, 2010 11:13 am

Some sound advice above. Just thought I'd add some thoughts on dealing with bad shots.

1. When you do a bad shot you will feel some frustration or anger. I think it's OK to relieve some of the tension with an exclamation such as "No!" or "Rubbish" but not too loud and not profane, no 4 letter words please.

2. Once the disc has landed, let go of those negative feelings asap. It's not good for you or the group to be in a bad mood. Move on, and you can signify that you have done this by saying something like "Ah well, it will be an interesting approach from down there" This has to be said in a positive way, albeit with a touch of irony. If you are still in a grump, then keep quiet.
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Post by Del » Fri Feb 19, 2010 11:45 am

A more fundamental solution to getting a positive mental attitude would be to study Buddhism and meditate.

Negative emotions don't help you. You will experience them, but recognise why you feel them, and then let them go.

When you are a baby, you cannot communicate your thoughts, feelings and requirements, so throwing your toys out of the pram is an effective way of getting attention which may solve your problems. As an adult you can communicate, so you don't need to throw a strop, and besides, your Mum and Dad aren't going to be there to make everything better for you.

Negative emotions are not just ineffective, they cloud your perceptions and lead to misunderstandings, they also tend to spread to other people, and that may eventually come back to haunt you.

I take great comfort from knowing that nobody in this community will be taking the piss out of me for this;-)
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Post by Del » Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:13 pm

Gamesmanship - What Not to Say

In casual rounds, the good natured banter and sledging is generally accepted and good fun. In tournament play, you need to rein this in. Obviously you don't say things like "watch out for the river on this drive" as they step up to the tee; or "Didn't you go OB on this last round?" Don't say anything that might put someone off.

Less obviously, you can complement people on good shots, but don't say things like "You're putting really well", or "you haven't missed one from that distance today" as they go to take a putt; or "Are you on for personal best?" as they near the end of the round.

Having said this, most people don't want to go round in silence. If you know the person and can read their mood, you can joke about a bad shot. This can diffuse tension and help everyone.
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Post by rhatton1 » Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:21 pm

Del wrote:Gamesmanship - What Not to Say

In casual rounds, the good natured banter and sledging is generally accepted and good fun. In tournament play, you need to rein this in. Obviously you don't say things like "watch out for the river on this drive" as they step up to the tee; or "Didn't you go OB on this last round?" Don't say anything that might put someone off.

Less obviously, you can complement people on good shots, but don't say things like "You're putting really well", or "you haven't missed one from that distance today" as they go to take a putt; or "Are you on for personal best?" as they near the end of the round.

Having said this, most people don't want to go round in silence. If you know the person and can read their mood, you can joke about a bad shot. This can diffuse tension and help everyone.
Are you paying attention to the above Mr Willetts? :wink: although the final bit is so true with me. If I look like i'm about to have a strop please laugh at me, I hate it when I've caused a group to go silent.
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Post by mat cutler » Fri Feb 19, 2010 2:15 pm

bruce wrote:
I like to have a target score for every hole I play, in a rough kind of way. So at QP hole 1 I'm targeting a 3, I know that when I step up to the tee, and the shot I elect to throw should reflect that. So while I might well be able to throw a driver through the first gap, have it fade and come to rest in the second gap and give myself a long putt for a 2, I'll get a lot more 4s that way. Instead I throw a Roc because it's won't get a wicked fade into the trees, or go too long into the bushes, erring on the right side because I know I can get up and down from the trees in the middle of the fairway a darn sight easier than from the left.

So yes, play one shot at a time, but play it not just on its merits but on the merits of the next shot you'll have to play too. Just cos you can do some thing doesn't mean you should
Bruce is very right about this especially at QP where a lot of the holes at first glance appear to be a potential birdie! I think hole 1 and hole 11 are the only holes I have never 2'd at some stage. However what score will make open final - 54 ? and you wouldn't be far off with 3 rounds under 60. Break the round down to each hole and then each shot and gaining a 3 on each hole becomes loads easier!

All about circle of confidence, there are 2;

i) is where you can get down in 2 from 95% of the time say 25m radius?
ii) is where you will make 95% of your putts from say 6m radius?

All you need to do with your drive on any hole is play the highest percentage shot to get within your 25m circle, in bounds with hopefully a fairly clear line of trees and obstacles to the basket. mentally reward yourself when you land in this circle. To the rest of your group it might look a pretty average shot but the confidence and positive thoughts you will build for your next shot is invaluable. You now have an up and down you are almost certain of getting.

I often notice with all lot of players is when it goes slightly wrong off the tee,it will invariably do so, they feel they have to make up for the shot and put huge pressure on themselves to get it under the pin from deep in the bushes. Don't! accept your bad shot but make sure it is just 1 dropped shot. Be prepared to play backwards, sideways etc to leave yourself in the good spot you were aiming for back on the tee. In this way you could throw utter rubbish off every tee and only get a 72. But hey it would only take half your drives to be "ok" in the 25m circle for a 65 - a fairly steady score in the middle of the field?

On the long holes and difficult ones where trying to get within the 25m circle is less than 75% for you don't attempt it but leave yourself an easy shot from 30-45m to get within your 6m circle. to land in a 12m diameter circle around a basket from 40m should be fairly easy again reward yourself for this it was a good approach even if isn't a gimme!

The best example for me of this at QP is hole 17 I never go for a 2 here although i know I can easily reach, I throw 55m hyzer bomb off the tee to 10m short of the gap ( a super safe and reliable shot for me). leaving probably 35m then within 6m for a 3 - ok i have taken a 4 before with the 5% of putts i will miss from this distance but I'm much more likely getting a 4 or worse going for the 2.

When I'm playing practice rounds in Bristol we often are constantly designing new holes, (walkers/grass/UWE glenside to short otherwise,etc) coming up with a par for these is good practice for playing competitions. If you treat each lie you find your self in as a new tee assess the shot options and come up for a par from where you are. If you play to this par fell good about your score, if you beat it feel as happy as you would with a birdie! This also helps you think about your next 1,2 or 3 shots rather than the last - which you cannot change.

If you are the sort of person who find playing this percentage golf and not going for the pin on any of the holes in 18 holes boring or difficult (I strongly put myself in this category!) Pick 2 or 3 holes in your round as fun holes where you can get out the big dog and ATTACK and have some fun. Pick the holes wisely there are holes you can do this on at QP and holes you definitely shouldn't attack! For me I attack hole 4 and hole 12 . Hole 4 because apart from the mando's it is fairly safe all round. 12 because you can play safe and still end up with a few roll aways and a 5 or 6! Your fun holes should be very different as it is very personal to you. choose wisely have fun and play sensibly on the other 15 or 16 holes!

good luck have a good weekend and someone beat robins! :twisted:

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Post by rhatton1 » Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:01 pm

I don't think I made my point very clear earlier. I always have a deliberate plan in my head before every hole as to where I want the first shot to land - what will give me the best percentages for making the least amount of shots. What I was trying to say is don't get hung up on the score, pretty much like your point Matt. Sometimes it feels people are so desperate to get the 3 after a bad first shot (me definitely included in this number) that they will play a stupid non percentage shot as a second shot which is more likely to go wrong get you stuck in the rubbish and pick up 5 or worse, instead of just backing down and accepting a 4's a good score from where your first disc lay.

The reason on hole one I go for quite an attacking drive is that this for me is the percentage shot. The drive is the part of my game I can fall back on and rely to fire, doing that approach I get about 60% 3's on hole 1, 30 % 4's and 10% other (admittedly an OB six the other day) If I try Bruces approach I drop down to about 40% 3's as my approaching from just past the two trees is often poor.

I would suggest there are more attacking holes at Quarry Park than 2 or 3 a round though. I tend to find the more timid I am around there the worse I shoot. but then I don't approach or putt very well so I have to rely on a good drive on most holes. 17 I would completely agree on, the percentage shot is defintely the layup, unfortunately I have recently found I have the range to get up there in one shot and it keeps tempting me to err.... Must ...be.... more.... disciplined. I wonder if Ivan has put in to plan some of his proposed changes though on that hole this weekend....could be interesting for the sensible minded players amongst us.

Personally I find it the safer option is to attack on 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 16 and 18 and try to play sensible on the rest, that's probably why I never play well in competitions though....
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Post by West » Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:55 pm

Ok, I've been resisting posting on here but I feel it's time for my 2pence :)

Drop you heart rate
When you get to your lie, take a deep breath and try and lower your heart rate. Especially when its a "pressure" putt. You've got time, you don't need to rush. Relax.

Go backwards if required
Leading on from what Matt (and a few others) said, if the first shot is poor and you're in the crap, go sideways, go backwards etc. This I agree is something which seems counter productive until you do it for the first time and then it makes perfect sense. On hole 10 at QP I've ended up in the crud to either side of the fairway more times than I've birdied it (altho less often recently) however, I was in the crap on the righ the other day about 1/2 way down the fair way. No out, no over, no forward ... I just popped it out into the middle of the fairway so I had a good stance for the third shot, was up and down for a 4 and moved on. Was happy. A few years ago I'd have tried to power it out and forward, 95% of the time into more crap and ended up with a 5 or 6.

As for holes to go for it on ... I'll have a crack at hole 7 at QP and a few others depending on feeling/weather etc etc etc., Spring Jump at Whitcombe and holes 1 and 12 at Croydon :)
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rhatton1
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Post by rhatton1 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:45 am

Why can't we follow our own advice? I was managing it for the first 14 holes of the first round and then let one little bit of stupidity affect me to bogey the remaining holes. Then never quite found my way back to confidence again.

Dunc so close, so good for so long and then 75?

Westy....um...shall we practice some more?

Bruce thanks for the putting/approach class at lunch, it felt really good and I'm going to start practising that from here on in.

In fairness though, Jester did follow his never give up advice although Del, well, I found your gamesmanship in our after round doubles too be truly unprofessional
:wink: The rest of us were courteous and polite whilst others were on tee and you were quite frankly a disgrace :lol:
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